Moustache Status

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Of the opposite sex, I have the moustache and, in general, the face.

 

A moustache to a man is the same as a fringe is to a woman. When you’ve got it, you want to grow it out; when you’ve grown it out, you want to cut it.

 

I will never shave off my beard and moustache. I did once, for charity, but my wife said, ‘Good grief, how awful, you look like an American car with all the chrome removed.’

 

I think there is nothing sexier than a handlebar moustache.

 

I don’t have the confidence to pull off a moustache.

 

A cinema villain essentially needs a moustache so he can twiddle with it gleefully as he cooks up his next nasty plan.

 

I can’t grow a moustache.

 

Though sporting a hideous mustache is in no way comparable to the physical pain and mental suffering men with these diseases endure, Movember still forces participants to challenge their manhood on a daily basis. Growing a moustache for men’s cancer isn’t as feel-good an activity as running a marathon for a cure.

 

I was born with my moustache and, no, I’ve never been tempted to shave it off. I don’t spend a lot of time worrying about my face and, like Gilbert and Sullivan’s Katisha, my best feature is my left shoulder-blade.

 

They say it’s good but I didn’t know what I was doing until I got into the suit and they put the moustache on me, and somehow, when I got all the drag on, it came out. It was the most amazing thing. I’m truly extraordinary.

 

I got a tooth bust by somebody who decided they didn’t like me and I thought the moustache hid a scar on my lip. It’s true that people were told facial hair was not appreciated by the British public, but I just decided to keep the moustache.

 

I had Hallowe’en parties every year, as it was my birthday five days before. My parents would actually put prosthetic noses on, and my dad would wear a top-hat and tails, put on a fake curly moustache, and hold a pipe.

 

When people say ‘Charlie Chaplin’ I still think now of the guy in the moustache and bowler hat and funny walk – I don’t think of an old man who was my grandfather.

 

I have been growing this moustache, a budding Burt Reynolds number, for a good cause known as Movember.

 

I always looked up to my grandfather. He wore Italian zip-up CAT boots, and he had a moustache which he waxed into a twirl – now that is worth looking up to.

 

In ‘Pacific Rim’ I had to have a haircut I wouldn’t usually rock. However, the moustache I had in the film – that might have to come out again. It was a good moustache. Good times.

 

I’m not a good hipster – if I let my moustache grow for weeks, it just looks like I have dirt on my face. I’ll never have a glorious handlebar moustache.

 

For whatever reason, I decided: ‘I’m 18, I’m a man, I’m going to grow a moustache’ – and it was pathetic for years – it was awful.

 

Really, for an actor, it’s all about remembering a lot of stuff – and keeping the moustache on.

 

It’s true that people were told facial hair was not appreciated by the British public, but I just decided to keep the moustache.

 

I haven’t got an opportunity to experiment with the dimensions of my moustache much. But yes, if the role demands, I’m ready to shave it off. I feel it’s good to have moustaches for South films, but I’d love to remove my moustache; why not?

 

I’m happiest on set because I’m not myself. I’m someone else. The moustache, the dinner jacket. It’s not me. You’re always this sort of double, and it’s liberating. Imagine being stuck with yourself… all those doubts.

 

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